Critical Pedagogy of Place

The article we read this week presented a very different view on things than previous material we have covered. It talked about how the Mushkegowuk Cree have a very rich connection with the land and how they believe it plays a huge role in the development in children intellectually, emotionally, socially, physically, and spiritually.

Ways the community worked together to inhabit their culture was by bringing the youth and elders together to learn together and share their knowledge of the meaning of the land. Another way they tried to bring back their culture was by having the youth interview the elders, and other community members. This allowed deep connections which would help to strengthen the community as a whole. The radio broadcast was also highly significant, I believe, because it was shared for everyone to hear and think about. Lastly the journey along the river that the elders took the youth on they learn about how to live off of nature would be the most impactful and practice learning experience for the youth to engage in. This would have deeper meaning and connections to the youth because it was lived out and not just talked about.

An example the article shared about decolonizing would be allowing the children to change or shorten names for things because they were difficult to say or remember, this would have a negative impact on the culture because as the children would grow up they would continue to use fewer and fewer of the original words in their language causing it to slowly be changed, and even disappear.

A way I would connect this to my own teaching, particularly in math, would be taking more time to deeper understand and make connections with First Nations content and the context in which they come and adapt the material accordingly. I believe however, that math is a subject area in which is lacking the inclusion of Frist Nations knowledge and I am still struggling with coming up with ways that it can be included in the learning process.

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